Nursing / Computer Science

English as Second Language

English as Second Language (ESL)

 

Program Description and Objectives

 

The ESL program courses are divided into six proficiency levels (Beginning, Beginning High, Intermediate, Intermediate High, Advanced, and Advanced High) in three programs (Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced) and four skill areas (Listening, Speaking, Reading &Vocabulary, and Writing & Grammar). The full-time ESL student takes a cluster of Oral Communication, Written Communication, and Pronunciation & Vocabulary totaling 18 hours per week for 6 Weeks. All levels provide daily communication practice in speaking and listening, reading, writing, and communicative grammar. In addition, students work with audio, video, computer software, the Internet and an online grammar program.

 

Admission Requirements

 

  1. High school diploma or GED
  2. 18 years or older
  3. Mission Statement Agreement Form
  4. Application Form
  5. Payment of $ 50.00 application fee

 

Method of Instruction

 

Lecture – teaching the material based on the subject by conveying theory, issue and observation.

Discussion – professor leads discussion such as group discussion.

Seminar – a student is assigned with topic to research and present in the class

Presentation – a student makes oral and written presentation

Group Project – a student work on topic or issue together by the means of collaboration.

Essay – a student defends her or his stance based on the arguments

Quiz – a student learns thing from taking quiz.

Examination – a student is assigned to sit in the mid-term and final examination.

Practicum – a student is assigned to learn theory and skills.

 

Graduation Requirements

 

Student who successfully completed 1 through 6 levels of courses are entitled to receive certificate. In order for successful completion, students must pass each level exam including the exit exam at the end of the six levels.

 

Description of Educational Program

 

The English as Second Language program courses are divided into six proficiency levels (Beginning, Beginning High, Intermediate, Intermediate High, Advanced, and Advanced High) in three programs (Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced) and four skill areas (Listening, Speaking, Reading &Vocabulary, and Writing & Grammar). The full-time ESL student takes a cluster of Oral Communication, Written Communication, and Pronunciation & Vocabulary totaling 18 hours per week for 6 Weeks. All levels provide daily communication practice in speaking and listening, reading, writing, and communicative grammar. In addition, students work with audio, video, computer software, the Internet and an online grammar program.

 

Courses Title and Descriptions

 

ESL Beginning Level

Students enter the beginning level with a rudimentary foundation in English.  They are able to read and write on a limited basis.  They communicate with difficulty and many errors.  They use very simple and unelaborated answers.  They hesitate a lot and have no ability to extend conversation.  They use simple grammar and vocabulary.  They have little or no control over basic grammar.  They communicate survival needs in a very simple manner.

 

Listening

They can understand some common phrases and words used to give basic personal information.

They can also understand social greetings and phrases used to talk about the present time and place.  They are beginning to understand the main ideas of complete sentences.

 

Speaking

They use gestures and one to three word utterances.  They have no control of grammar.

 

Reading

They understand some practical words and phrases found on restaurant menus, signs, and product labels. They recognize, read, and write numbers and letters, but they have limited understanding of connected prose without much repetition.

 

Writing

They write a limited number of basic words and familiar phrases.  They may also be able to write simple sentences, phrases and messages.  They can write basic personal information with frequent errors in punctuation and spelling. Their narrative writing is unclear.

 

Functional & Workplace Skills None in English.

 

ESL Beginning High Level

 

Students enter the beginning high level with the ability to read and write in English.  They are more confident in communicating their immediate needs. They hesitate less and can give more detail in simple answers.  They have slightly more control of grammar and a slightly broader vocabulary. 

 

Listening

They understand the main ideas of complete sentences.  They are less anxious about listening and comprehend a wider range of vocabulary used in context.

 

Speaking

They make attempts to extend conversation but still communicate with difficult and many errors.

 

Reading

They understand words and phrases found on restaurant menus, signs, and product labels. They recognize connected prose as well as read and write numbers and letters.

 

Writing

They write a number of basic words and familiar phrases.  They can write simple sentences, phrases, and messages.  They can write basic personal information with fewer errors in punctuation and spelling. Their narrative writing is understandable.

 

Functional & Workplace Skills

None in English.

 

ESL Intermediate Level

 

Students enter the intermediate low level with the ability to read and write in English.  They have more satisfactory command of English for communicating their basic survival needs.

 

Listening

They understand the main ideas of complete sentences.  They understand some main parts of discussion topics they know. They can follow a limited amount of important details.

 

Speaking

They attempt interactive conversation and more complex grammar.

 

Reading

They understand some main ideas, some facts, social announcements, instructions, and short descriptions of people, places, and things. They can follow simple and compound sentences in single or linked paragraphs containing familiar vocabulary.

 

Writing

They can write notes and messages for familiar situations but sometimes lack clarity and focus. Their sentence structure lacks variety but shows some control of basic grammar.  They also use punctuation more consistently.

 

Functional & Workplace Skills

Students can interpret simple directions, schedules, signs, and maps. They can fill out simple forms with some supports for more complicated sections.  They can handle routine entry-level jobs which involve some written or oral English. They can also use simple computer programs to perform routine tasks.

 

 

ESL Intermediate High Level

 

Students enter the intermediate high level with enough ability in the use of English to function independently in most familiar situations. They have inconsistent control of more complex grammar. They rely on description and concrete terms. In social situations, they can use new phrases with some hesitation.

 

Listening

They comprehend conversations containing some unfamiliar vocabulary.

 

Speaking

Students have some ability to participate in face-to-face conversations on topics beyond their survival needs. They can also clarify meaning by asking questions.

 

Reading

They understand some main ideas, some facts, social announcements, instructions, and short descriptions of people, places, and things. They can follow simple and compound sentences in single or linked paragraphs containing familiar vocabulary.

 

Writing

They can interpret actions required in specific written directions. 

They can also write simple paragraphs with main ideas and supporting details on familiar topics. 

They can self-edit spelling and punctuation errors.

 

Functional & Workplace Skills

They have some ability to communicate on the telephone on familiar subjects. They can follow oral and written instructions. They can complete basic medical forms and job applications.

 

ESL Advanced Level

 

Students enter the advanced-low level with the ability in the use of English to function effectively in familiar and unfamiliar social and academic situations.

They use advanced grammar and vocabulary.  Their errors do not hinder communication.

 

Listening

Students can comprehend conversation on unfamiliar topics and are beginning to understand essential points of discussion or speeches on topics in special fields of interest.

 

Speaking

Students converse well with lots of elaboration and interaction making occasional errors. However, they lack fluency in discussing technical subjects.

 

Reading

Students can read authentic materials on everyday subjects and non-technical prose but have difficulty reading technical materials. They can make some minimal inferences about familiar texts and compare and contrast information from such texts.

 

Writing

They can write simple narrative descriptions and short essays on familiar topics, such as customs in their native countries. They use basic punctuation consistently but make grammatical errors with complex structures.

 

Functional & Workplace Skills

They can interpret simple charts and graphs. They can handle jobs that require simple, oral and written instructions, multi-step diagrams and limited public interactions.

 

 

 

ESL Advanced High Level

 

Students enter the advance high level with the ability in the use of English to meet most routine social and academic demands with confidence, though not without occasional hesitation and circumlocutions.

 

Listening

They can understand a speaker who uses words to say more than their simple meaning, for example, cultural references.  They understand radio broadcasts, television reports and public addresses on non-technical topics.

 

Speaking

Students converse well with lots of elaboration and interaction making occasional errors.

They use complex grammar and advanced vocabulary, however, they still lack fluency in discussing technical subjects.

 

Reading

Students can understand most abstract and complex printed materials.  They comprehend more than what is directly stated and how the culture of people influences language. Students can read authentic materials on abstract topics in familiar contexts as well as descriptions and narrations of factual material.

 

Writing

They can write multi-paragraph essays with a clear introduction and development of ideas. Their writing contains well-formed sentences, appropriate mechanics and spelling with few grammatical errors.

 

Functional    & Workplace Skills

Students can meet most work demands with confidence.  They can also function effectively in work situations that require interaction with the public.  If their pronunciation inhibits fluency and communication, these students are able to adjust their language to be understood.